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Why Church?

Only a week ago at this time, it was Good Friday.

Since then, a lot has happened.

Between this time last week and the end of our fourth and final Easter Sunday service, over 1,500 people worshipped here. That’s a lot of people.

Literally hundreds of hours of preparation went into planning and carrying out our nine separate Maundy Thursday/Good Friday/Easter Sunday services, from the office staff to the Altar Guild, to musicians, clergy, ushers greeters and readers. I’m appreciative of everyone’s efforts all year round, but I’m especially thankful this time of year, when so much is happening.

I said that since Good Friday, “a lot has happened.” And that this time of year, “so much is happening.”

But what is it, exactly, that happened since Good Friday? What’s behind all the activity, all the worship? What’s the point?

I asked three questions in my Easter sermon:


  • When we come to church, do we expect to be changed?


  • Does the beauty (and power) of Sunday morning fade, or does it draw you closer to God throughout the week?


  • Do the words we say, sing, and hear take root, so that the peace of the Lord IS always with you, and that, through you, God’s kingdom is coming, God’s will is being done on earth?

Those questions weren’t just for Easter Sunday. They’ll guide our conversation for all of the Easter season.

Because what difference does attending church make, if it doesn’t make a difference in the way we live?

In other words, why church? Why not live your faith as a “spiritual” person, without identifying yourself with a church community?

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