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Snow, and a Meaningful Advent and Christmas



(Photo credit: Steve Axeman)

Well, first--as I sat down to write this (Friday morning about 10:00) it started SNOWING! There’s already enough to cover the ground.

Yay! I love snow! Not just because I’m a Midwesterner who loves cold weather--we believe cold weather builds character, you know--but because when I see snow, I think of God blanketing the earth. Or should I say God re-blanketing the earth, with love, in the middle of winter, much the same way a parent re-blankets a sleeping child in the middle of the night.

Snow “tucks the earth in” a bit. Snow quiets things down (at least until the snow blowers come out) and is comforting (at least until we have to start shoveling it.)

I know some of you feel differently about snow, and even dislike it. And granted, loving snow is easier for someone like me who walks to work! But those of you who agree with me: let’s lift our coffee cups in a toast and say, in our best Dean Martin voice, “Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!”

There, now that that’s out of my system, what I wanted to share with you this week is a video. The video makes, in a compelling, clipped, and fresh way, the same point I was making in last week’s e-Pistle and have been trying to make for years during Advent: that the “good news of great joy” available to us at Christmastime is that God is near, and is available.

Take a look and see for yourself. And please know it’s never too late to create, or re-create, an Advent and Christmas that is truly meaningful.

Watch the video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVqqj1v-ZBU

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