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"Photogratude," Day 1

With the start of my new ministry today as Rector of The Falls Church Episcopal, I thought I'd start something new on this blog.

And that is to share "one photo and one attitude" that pretty much summarizes that particular day.

I think I even coined a new term for it: "photogratude."

So -- no promises it'll be done every single day, but a promise I'll try on most -- here's today's photo and accompanying attitude:

In case you can't make it out, the photo is me holding my new business card in front of my new, very empty office.

The accompanying attitude is a thought that a friend and colleague emailed to me today. She said,

"I hope you're having a good first day. I have no idea how you're feeling about your new job...but I've read this quote in Bill Johnson's new book a couple times and decided to send it to you.

He says,
'When you're willing to do what you're unqualified to do, that's what qualifies you.'"
 (She went on to say she does think I'm qualified...!)

But she wanted me to have that quote in those times I'm feeling unsure or overwhelmed -- as we are all bound to feel in those times we have stepped out in faith, or walked off our maps.

So there you have it: a photogratude for today. 

Comments

  1. Cool idea, John!

    It's poetic that it stars with the empty office. Over the years I'm sure that those shelves will be filled with the documentation, symbols, and reminders of numerous, amazing ministries, some of which you can't even imagine just yet. You will hear them being sent to you, though. I am absolutely sure of that!

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  2. I am reminded of the day of my ordination when a friend handed me a card celebrating the day. The inside was blank except for her handwritten note. It said, "Ed, minister out of your brokenness rather than your giftedness." None of us are qualified to do the work God calls us to do, but God has given us this formula: God + me = enough.

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  3. Congratulations on day 2 brother! Here is a quote from "Thoughts in Silence" by Thomas Merton:

    "God, we have no idea where we are going. We do not see the road ahead for us. We cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do we really know ourselves.

    The fact that we think we are following your will does not mean we are actually doing so. But we believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you. And we hope that we have that desire in all we are doing. We hope that we will never do anything apart from that desire.

    And we know that if we do this you will lead us by the right road, though we may know nothing about it.

    Therefore, we will trust you always though we may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death. We will not fear, for you are ever with us and you will never leave us to face our perils alone."

    Blessings on your new Holy Adventure...lunch in Seven Corners soon? Daniel+

    ReplyDelete

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