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TFC E-vangelon

One of the things that people said they found helpful when I was Rector of St. James' was a weekly message I sent out, so now that I've caught my breath a tiny bit in my new position as Rector of The Falls Church Episcopal, I thought I'd carry that custom over.

It doesn't seem right to keep using the name "e-Pistle," -- St. James' is still using that, and this is a new thing in a new place anyway, so I knew I had to come up with a new name.

So...what do you think?...I landed on "TFC E-vangelon," which is a play on words on the "E" in "The Falls Church Episcopal" as well as the "e" in "evangelon" which is the Greek word for "good news."

So here is my very first "TFC E-vangelon" -- let me know what you think of it.


For today's "TFC E-vangelon," I want to share a line from the tiny little (and little-known) book (letter) in the Bible called Jude. 

It's Jude 1:2, as paraphrased by Eugene Peterson in his wonderful paraphrase of the Bible called The Message:

Relax, everything's going to be all right;
Rest, everything's coming together;
Open your hearts, love is on the way!

Maybe it's just me, but starting this new call in this new place, facing the breath-taking challenges and opportunities we as this faith community face, I've been grateful to have that scripture passage somewhere where I can see it.

Frequently.

Like on some days five or six times a day!

Because that passage reminds us of something we tend to forget:

We are not ultimately in charge.

God gives us much to do...much important work...and it is our joy to do that work as hard as we can for as long as we can.

But ultimately this (the faith community called The Falls Church Episcopal, the wider Episcopal Church/Anglican Communion, and for that matter Christianity in general) are NOT "our" church or our communities.

They are "begun, continued, and ended" in God.

In other words, God is in charge.

So:

Relax, everything's going to be all right;
Rest, everything's coming together;
Open your hearts, love is on the way!

Comments

  1. John, I do miss your E-Pistles at St. James. I used to read them every week and "critique" many back atcha:-)
    Glad to have the chance to read them again--even by another name-This week you wrote another thought-provoking piece that always seems to mirror something that happened this past week. I have always prided myself in having good time-management skills so that I would feel that "I was the one in charge of my day". However, one day this past week, despite careful planning, I left the house for a teaching assignment and forgot my Day-timer and wallet with my driver's license in it. I started to panic but then stopped, took a deep breath and asked God for calm. I then thought--all I had to do was drive carefully, observig all traffic signs and IF I would get stopped, explain my situation. The rest of the day was PEACEFUL--so I now re-learned that I only THOUGHT that I was in charge of the day.

    ReplyDelete

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