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One of Those Things You Need to Hear Every so Often...

"Dear Jamal,

"Somone I once knew wrote that we walk away from our dreams afraid we may fail or worse yet, afraid we may succeed.

"You need to know that while I knew so very early that you would realize your dreams, I never imagined I would once again realize my own.
"Seasons change, young man, and while I may have waited until the winter of my life, to see the things I've seen this past year, there is no doubt I would have waited too long, had it not been for you."

-- William Forester, to Jamal Wallace, in Finding Forrester

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