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Pentecost Marathon


This Sunday is Pentecost Sunday, the day we commemorate and celebrate the Holy Spirit being given to the early church. It's what many call "the birthday of the church."

Red is the color of Pentecost, partly because one of the metaphors for the Holy Spirit is fire, and so worshippers are encouraged to wear something red to church on Sunday. (Wind is another metaphor for the Holy Spirit, but I can't really see those little fan hats catching on in church, so I guess we're stuck with wearing red.)

Nope. Not happening.

Pentecost Sunday also starts a new church season (also called Pentecost), which is by far the longest season in the church year. Just think: in late November - that's right, November - you'll look down at your service leaflet and see that Sunday listed as "the 23rd Sunday after Pentecost."

So this Sunday, in addition to being a day of celebration itself, is also a bit of a starting gun for a marathon of a church season.

Like a marathon, it's foolish (impossible, really) to sprint, or rush through the season of Pentecost. Like a marathon, Pentecost - especially during the summer months - invites a slower, yet steady-and-determined pace. Like a marathon (and unique to marathons in the world of sports!), world-class champions of the faith and first-time amateurs in the faith all take part in the same Pentecost event.

Unlike a marathon, however, you don't have to have trained to begin the journey of Pentecost: grace means if you just keep showing up, the ability (and the strength, and the stamina) for the adventure will be given to you, as gift.

In the Spirit of the season of Pentecost, I'm also going to do something different with my weekly E-vangelon messages to my congregation, and blog posts here. And that is to get away from writing longer pieces on topics that vary from week to week, and instead write a series of short installments that stick to one topic: the Holy Spirit.

So beginning next week, and running through most of the summer and perhaps beyond, look here for shorter pieces that will, over time, unpack topics such as  
  • Who is the Holy Spirit?  
  • What does the Holy Spirit do?  
  • What does the Bible say about the Holy Spirit?  
  • How Do I Seek the Holy Spirit's guidance in Life's Significant Decisions? and 
  • How the Holy Spirit inspired the early church, and still inspires our church today. 

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