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Softly, Christmas


Many years ago, I received one of the most memorable Christmas gifts I've ever received.

It was the Fall of 1984, and I was a student at Vanderbilt Divinity School in Nashville. A classmate and friend of mine by the name of Kay gave me a sheet of fine paper on which she had written, in beautiful handwriting, a poem by Margaret Bundy Moss titled "Softly, Christmas." It's been 30 years, but each year at this time I remember the gift of these words:

Softly, Christmas

Walk softly
As you go through Christmas,
That each step may bring you
Down the starlit path
To the manger bed.

Talk quietly
As you speak of Christmas,
That you shall not drown out
The glorious song of angels
With idle talk and merriment.

Kneel reverently
As you pause for Christmas,
That you may feel again
The spirit of the Nativity
Rekindled in your soul.

Rise eagerly
After you have trod
The Christmas path,
That you may serve more fully
The One whose birth we hail.

                                      -- Margaret Bundy Moss

Thanks, Kay. May your gift enrich others as it has me.

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