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A Theory about God

I have a theory.

I have a theory about God. 

And my theory is this: 

The only concept of God more threatening than an
angry,
judgmental,
strict,
foreboding
condemnatory god


is a concept of God who is a
kind,
merciful
gentle
approachable,
compassionate God.

For just a minute, allow yourself to believe that what was said to Jesus at his baptism was said to us at ours, and is being said even now: 

You are my Son. You are my daughter. 

You are beloved. 

You are the one I love. 

With you -- yes, you -- I am well pleased.

Do you feel yourself pushing that thought away, running, resisting it? Even as I write the words, I hear a voice inside me saying, “No, that was a special relationship God the father was expressing to God the Son and he’s said that to no other human being; those words must have been intended for Jesus, not me."

I don’t think there’s any point in denying that that voice exists. The question is, whose voice is that? 

Where does it come from – the Holy Spirit, or some other spirit? Does that voice draw you closer to God, make you trust in more, or does it help you keep God at arm’s length, and continue to trust in something other than God?

Each year around Christmastime, I ask the question: "God could have come down in any form he wanted: he has created the heavens and the earth, the stars.

So, why come in the form of a baby?"

Could it be that God’s deepest desire is that we fall in love with him?

Why would God come down as a newborn? Why not a full-grown adult?

Could it be that part of what God was up to that first Christmas was an effort to overcome our distance?  Could it be that what God wants more than anything else is that we throw away our defensive armor, and that we fall in love with him? 

God’s greatest desire is to be desired…and so a corollary theory about God is this: God is saddest not when we fail, but when we push God, and those made in the image of God, away. 

How would believing that change the way you pray? Worship? Behave? 

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