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David and Goliath, and Your Goliath

This Sunday, I'm wrapping up a three-part sermon series based on the David story found in I Samuel. Two Sundays ago, we heard about Israel's insisting, over the prophet Samuel's warnings, that they should have their own King (King Saul). Last Sunday, we heard about the anointing of the young shepherd boy David as Israel's second King, despite the fact he was the youngest (and least likely) of many older brothers, and despite the fact that at the time of David's anointing, Saul was still King. We also looked at how we can put our faith in the God of Surprises

This Sunday we get the to the actual David and Goliath story. I have a working title for the sermon based on a popular saying: "Don't Just Tell God How Big Your Problems Are: Tell Your Problems How Big Your God Is." 

Take a close look at this illustration:
Imagine yourself as David. Smaller, un-armed. No military experience. You're facing a giant of a soldier, who IS experienced, and well-equipped.

Imagine whatever difficulty you are facing to be Goliath. Above you. Intimidating you. Mocking you.

You have every possible disadvantage.

Except one: you've been given a promise, by God, that has not come true yet. (David at this point is still a shepherd, not King). You know, by faith in God, that the same God who delivered you from lions and bears will deliver you now.

Here's my point: we are accustomed to thinking of David as the underdog -- in fact he's become the classic underdog.

But actually, David has a huge advantage. An insurmountable advantage. He has a promise from God, and he has confidence in that God.

And the amazing thing is, his advantage can be yours, as you face whatever you are facing.

God can help you, like David, overcome seemingly impossible odds.  

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