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"Don't just tell God how big your Problems are -- tell your Problems how big your God is."

I wrapped up a three-part series on the David and Goliath story this Sunday by using a familiar expression, "Don't just tell God how big your problems are; tell your problems how big your God is." 

To make that point visually, I took a little post-it note, held it up, and said "here's you." 

I then held up an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper and said "here's your problem." And I put the post-it note on the corner of the paper, and held it up. The obvious point being, compared to the size of our problem, we seem very small. 



At the beginning of the sermon, I had asked the congregation to imagine the Goliath they were facing: a challenge, a seemingly insurmountable odd, a struggle.

Then (after preaching the majority of the sermon) I said, imagine your problem – your giant – moving closer to you. 

Like Goliath, your problem has every advantage in its fight against you: it’s above you, it’s bigger than you are, it’s stronger than you are.

It has every advantage except one, that is:

You have God-confidence.

You are measuring your giant not against your size, but God’s size.  

Up until this point in the sermon, I'd been preaching from where I normally do: at the crossing, a few steps up from the pews, in front of the altar, but near floor level. 

But at that point in the sermon, I went up to our pulpit-lectern, balcony-level, put the paper on the lower-left corner of the window behind the lectern-pulpit, pointed to it, and then said something I hope I can remember, because, as they say, preachers are often preaching to themselves: 
Photo: Debbie Gegenheimer
When we compare our giants to God’s size -- when we put our hope and faith in the mysterious, uncontrolled and uncontrollable God of surprises yet upon whose force we can rely -- then we, like David, have God-confidence. 

When we make this shift in perspective, we have God-authority and a sense of God-destiny. We’re in a target-rich environment. We, like David, have a huge advantage.

When we have a “how can I help” service mentality we use the strength of what is coming against us, against it.

One stone, with divine trajectory, takes out Goliath.

One candle pierces the darkness of an entire room.

One act of forgiveness pierces the darkness of sin.

Because ultimately, the David and Goliath story is not so much a story about David, or Goliath as it is a story about God, and God’s care and love and protection and encouragement. 

And how God can help you, like David, overcome seemingly impossible odds.

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