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Letting Go, Holding On

High school graduation season. 

It's a delightful disruption to the schedule, as our friends' children graduate and we attend their parties, and as we prepare to host our own tomorrow morning after daughter Elizabeth graduates. 

A recurring theme at high school graduation parties is photo displays. Here's the rough, first stab at a layout...although Elizabeth hasn't seen it yet, so it's prior to the "Dad, please don't put that out there!" screening and editing process.  
High school graduation photo displays are a rare chance to celebrate a loved one; to celebrate a life still very much being lived.

On the table is a photo I took of Elizabeth about 18 minutes of age:


 And another photo of her about 18 years of age, looking as young-adultish as ever:


but my favorite -- the Elizabeth that is kind of frozen in my mind and heart and head -- is the one where she's holding on: 

High school graduation accentuates the process of letting go. And let go we will, proud and astonished to see this little girl now a young lady, so full of grace, so full of confidence, so boosted.  

We'll let go. But as parents we'll always be holding on. And full of joy for the times we're held onto. 

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