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Doubt

There is a version of Chrisitanity that implies (or comes right out and says) that it's somehow un-Christian to doubt.

Even worse, there's a version of Christianity that implies or says doubt is a sin.

If that's the kind of church abuse you were exposed to, you'll be glad to hear Sunday's Gospel and hear more about a branch of Christendom where doubt is not viewed as a sin. You'll be glad to know that
  • doubt has a place in the Bible; 
  • "doubting Thomas" has a place among the disciples,
  • doubting people have a place in this church.
God can work through any kind of doubt we have, but it's interesting that Thomas' doubt is a particular kind of doubt.

Thomas doesn't say, "I'm not interested in believing it."  He doesn't say, "Jesus alive again?!?--that's a stupid story!"

He says, "Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe."

So -- more about this in my sermon -- I think Thomas' doubt is really a desire. 

What Thomas wants more than anything is to experience God, right where he is.

And that's why all of us -- not just doubters or the doubting part of us -- can connect with Sunday's passage: because we can all connect with Thomas' desire to see and touch the Living Son of the Living God right where we are.

This is why church -- the Body of Christ -- is so important: how can Thomas -- how can we, how can the world -- possibly believe in the resurrection, unless he sees -- unless we see, unless the word sees -- the resurrected?

Comments

  1. There is a film out right now, "Risen," about a Roman Soldier who is sent to investigate the "supposed Resurrection of Jesus." At one point the soldier is in the Upper Room with JC and most of the Disciples when Thomas comes in....Thomas' giddiness at seeing Christ and his touching the wounds suggests just that...not doubt as a negative, but a desire to which Jesus appears to offer himself for.

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