Skip to main content

Labor Day Resolutions?

Labor Day - this Monday -- means different things to different people.

To many workers, it retains its original meaning - a welcome break from physical labor in the form of a Federal holiday.

To other workers, Labor Day is synonymous with "Labor Day Weekend" and means a picnic, barbecue, or one last relaxing weekend getaway.

And for many of us, Labor Day and the end of summer means the resumption of Fall routines. In that sense, Labor Day is more of a "New Year's Day" than January 1st, because -- with the resumption of school and more predictable work patterns - early September is the time of year we get back into habits and routines.

So if this is a time for you to develop new eating, exercise, and sleep patterns, why not new spiritual habits as well?

I invite you, therefore, in the name of the church, to join me in making "Labor Day Resolutions," using some time this Monday to think through your daily and weekly habits, and deliberately schedule time for weekly worship and daily prayer and Bible reading in those habits.

I invite you to join me in carving out time - now, before the calendar really fills up! -for you and God to be alone together: fifteen minutes to half an hour a day to sit alone in uninterrupted silence. (If you need help developing a prayer ritual, here's one good way to start; and here is a resource for guides to reading the Bible.


There are few guarantees in life, but I promise you this:

If you set aside daily time to develop conversational intimacy with God, and stick to it, you will find God

  • stirring your heart, 
  • redirecting and better marshaling your energies, 
  • calming your mind, and 
  • filling you with a grace and a peace that you've never known before. 

I guarantee it, because God promises it.

And prayer is always response: response to God's prior invitation and initiative.

So: what's your response?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

If there's a will, there's a way.

For Lent, I was thinking of doing the typical fasts: fast from Facebook and take up reading, fast from petty vices like overindulging in sweets and alcohol and take on moderation, yada yada yada.
But I'm re-thinking that this year.
What I'm fasting from this Lent is discouragement. That means cutting back on what is so often the source of discouragement, which is a tendency to gorge on, or dwell on, bad news.
(Let me be clear: that does not mean giving up news or otherwise burying my head in the sand: it means staying informed while finding ways not to get pulled into a downward spiral of feelings of numbness and helplessness; it means giving up unproductive feelings like hopelessness and resignation and taking on visible behaviors like giving encouragement and taking action.)
It means making visible -- here, on my blog, and even on Facebook -- the good.
Because the problem is -- to paraphrase the community organizer Rich Harwood -- a lot of times we see "good news stories…

Fasting from Discouragement, Making Visible the Good

So for Lent, I was thinking of doing the typical fasts: fast from Facebook and take up reading, fast from petty vices like overindulging in sweets and alcohol and take on moderation, yada yada yada.

But I'm re-thinking that.
Now one of the things I'm thinking about fasting from during Lent is discouragement. That means cutting back on what is so often the source of discouragement, which is a tendency to gorge on, or dwell on, bad news.
That would mean taking on encouragement: to make visible -- even on Facebook -- the good.
Because the problem is -- to paraphrase the community organizer Rich Harwood -- a lot of times we see "good news stories" as being quaint -- they are tossed in at the end of the news as an inspiring story, or put in the style section. But stories of good things happening -- people coming together to do things, is not a touchy-feely, feel-good story, but something affecting real change.
So for starters: I'm inspired by the leadership example of…