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"So-called" Judge Robart?

This clip is of the United States Senate voting, on June 17, 2004, on President George W. Bush's nomination of James L. Robart to be the U.S. District Judge for the Western District at Washington. Judge Robart is the one who issued a ruling yesterday that temporarily blocks one of the Executive Orders on immigration and refugees.

As an exercise in democracy, watch the clip. It's only 51 seconds long. Wait for it -- notice whose vote was the last affirmative vote.

Note what the final vote count was.

After watching, ask yourself: are there any other steps in our democracy that necessary to confirming a District judge?

After answering those questions, ask yourself:

Why would the person currently holding the office of President of the United States refer to Robart as a "so-called" judge?

“The opinion of this so-called judge, which essentially takes law-enforcement away from our country, is ridiculous and will be overturned!” Trump wrote.

The opinion of this so-called judge, which essentially takes law-enforcement away from our country, is ridiculous and will be overturned!
Recall that "so-called" means something is false...ostensible...supposed...not actually the case

Keep in mind the "so-called" phrase is in reference to the judge -- the office or position of judge itself, and is not about the substance of the ruling. 

(In my opinion, calling the judge's ruling a "so-called ruling" -- you know, calling the legitimacy or accuracy of the legal ruling into question -- would have been fair game. Rough and tumble politics and all.)

But that is not what is going on here: what is being called into question is the legitimacy of the judge himself.

Please, ask yourself: 

What is the intention of a President calling a judge who reverses one of his orders a "so-called" judge? 

Is it unreasonable to conclude this is an attempt, deliberately or not, by the President of the United States to undermine people's trust in this Judge, and therefore in the American judicial system, particularly when the attempt is coupled with an accusation that the judge's ruling "takes law-enforcement away from our country"? 

What is the end game of this Administration there? 

Are there United States Senators, other judges, or conservative Republicans who are alarmed by this?



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